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Sunday, February 23, 2020
dad and son doing woodworking
Students & Youth

Resources to help parents support teen career development

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According to the Government of Alberta, the youth of today are likely to experience an average of 15 employment transitions in their working lifetime, including occupations in up to five different sectors of the economy, a variety of concurrent work roles, and planned and unplanned gaps in employment. Parents play a large role in teen career development. They act as examples of employees and employers and are often the first to introduce their teens to the world of work. This includes exposure to varying industries, job titles and positions, as well as job roles, tasks and attitudes toward work and career education. The following guides, articles, websites, career activities and tools will benefit parents and teens in their career development journey.

Guides for parents

The following guides may be helpful to parents who want to support and encourage their teen’s career development.

Career activities and tools

Teens and students may benefit from the following interactive activities, assessments and tools to discover and brainstorm about their futures in the world of work.

4 fun career activities for secondary students (Kuder)

Ideas and activities for creating a career cluster T-shirt, presenting a career in your community, and brainstorming occupations and future careers within different industries.

Career Vision: resources for high school students

Ideas and links to resources on teen career exploration, early career planning and planning for post-secondary education.

My Blueprint

Simple student portfolios and career resources for students.

Teen Career Test and Resources – Holland Code

Teen career exploration tests and inventories (unpaid/paid).

The Decade After High School: A Parent’s Guide (CERIC) [Book]

This CERIC-published Guide, available for free download, describes the multiplicity of pathways that youth follow when training for and finding their way in a labour market that is vastly different from when their parents were starting out. This booklet offers practical suggestions for constructive roles parents can play, activities they can undertake and resources they can use to help their children make informed, personally satisfying career decisions.

What Colour is Your Parachute? for teens [Book]

This updated career guide for teens draws on the principles of What Color Is Your Parachute? by Carol Christen and Richard N. Bolles to help high school and college students zero in on their favourite skills and find their perfect major or career.

Career exploration for parents and teens

The following websites and articles will help parents in the specifics of guiding their teen as they begin to consider employment and career opportunities. It’s never too early or too late in your teenager’s life to begin these explorations!


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Leah Szabo Author
Leah Szabo is a certified career development professional in Vancouver. She is also a freelance writer and consultant on career development issues. Szabo has a background in teaching and has most recently worked as a Career Advisor and Facilitator. She is a graduate of the University of Victoria (BA) and the University of British Columbia (BEd), (MA – European Studies).
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Leah Szabo Author
Leah Szabo is a certified career development professional in Vancouver. She is also a freelance writer and consultant on career development issues. Szabo has a background in teaching and has most recently worked as a Career Advisor and Facilitator. She is a graduate of the University of Victoria (BA) and the University of British Columbia (BEd), (MA – European Studies).
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