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Tips & Training

Federal funding and supports for retraining in Canada

This is Part 1 of a two-part resource compilation of retraining funding and supports across Canada. Part 1 focuses on federally funded programs. Watch out for Part 2 in February, which will break down resources by province and territory. 

The onset of the pandemic triggered 2.7 million job losses across industries. While Canada’s labour market recently showed signs of growth, there is also a rise in job vacancies as some workers re-evaluate their career goals and work-life values. According to Randstad Canada, 43% of working Canadians say they are likely to look for a new job in 2022. In this fluid pandemic landscape, financial support from federal and provincial governments is available to help jobseekers pursuing a career shift, as well as employers who want to retrain staff. Here are funding and supports for individuals and organizations.

Apprenticeship Job Creation Tax Credit (AJCTC)

Under the AJCTC, employers can claim up to $2,000 per year for each eligible apprentice. An eligible apprentice is someone working in a Red Seal Trade. Red Seal Trades are designated trades governed by provincial and territorial apprenticeship laws, such as appliance service technician, ironworker and tower crane operator. The apprenticeship contract must be registered with a federal, provincial or territorial government.

Apprenticeship Grants

Several taxable cash grants are available, including up to $6,000 for women and up to $2,000 for people in Red Seal Trades.

Canada training credit (CTC)

The CTC was launched in 2020 as a new refundable tax credit to help individuals between 25 and 65 years old with training costs.

Indigenous Skills and Employment Training (ISET) Program

This program provides funding to Indigenous service delivery organizations that design and deliver job training services across First Nations, Inuit, Métis and urban/non-affiliated Indigenous people in their communities.

Workforce Development Agreements (WDAs)

The Government of Canada established WDAs to provide provinces and territories with funding to help Canadians build new skills. It aims to complement other federal initiatives like the Labour Market Development Agreement (LMDA). This page features WDAs with each province and territory.


Don’t want to miss Part 2? Sign up for CERIC’s free CareerWise Weekly newsletter to have top resources delivered to your inbox each Tuesday.

Katrina Rozal Author
Katrina Rozal is a Communication Specialist. She has 10 years of combined experience in producing content for Canadian news media and the British non-profit sector.
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Katrina Rozal Author
Katrina Rozal is a Communication Specialist. She has 10 years of combined experience in producing content for Canadian news media and the British non-profit sector.
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