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Monday, January 20, 2020
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Research & Trends

6 reports that caught our eye the week of Jan. 5, 2020

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Each week, CERIC is on the lookout for the latest reports related to career development. Here are six reports that we found interesting this week:

 All Together Now: Intergovernmental Relations in Canada’s Labour Market Sector (Institute for Research on Public Policy)

This report concludes that strong intergovernmental co-operation has become the norm in the labour market sector, exemplified by the creation of the Labour Market Information Council and the Future Skills Centre. What was at times a zero-sum federal-provincial fight has shifted to a situation where governments work in concert to address enduring problems.

Over-education Among University-educated Immigrants in Canada and the United States (Statistics Canada)

This study compares the differences in the mismatch between the education and occupations of immigrants in Canada and the United States, operationalized by over-education. It further explores how the cross-country differences may be related to the supply of and demand for university-educated immigrants and the way they are selected.

Understanding the role of the Careers Adviser within ‘Personal Guidance’ (Career Development Institute)

This UK briefing paper examines the role of careers adviser, their contribution to personal guidance and the benefits of a professionally qualified careers adviser.

Facts and Stats: Working Seniors in Canada (Vanier Institute)

A growing number of seniors in Canada today are choosing to remain in – or return to – the paid labour market to manage their multiple financial responsibilities and, for some, to provide support to younger generations. This fact sheet gathers statistics from a variety of sources about seniors, their economic well-being and their evolving relationship with the paid labour market.

Work is About More Than Money (Cardus)

This report begins with non-financial outcomes from work that are related to individuals (their physical and mental health). It then moves to outcomes related to families and finally to communities. It concludes by making the case for greater emphasis on the non-monetary aspects of work and a need for rethinking our policy framework around work.

Global Gender Gap Report 2020: Mind the 100-Year Gap (World Economic Forum)

None of us will see gender parity in our lifetimes, and nor likely will many of our children. That’s the sobering finding of the Global Gender Gap Report 2020, which reveals that gender parity will not be attained for 99.5 years.

Lindsay Purchase Administrator
Lindsay Purchase oversees CERIC’s tri-annual magazine, Careering, and the CareerWise website, along with the CareerWise Weekly newsletter. She has a background in journalism, having worked previously as a digital editor and reporter. Lindsay is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University’s Global Studies program.
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Lindsay Purchase Administrator
Lindsay Purchase oversees CERIC’s tri-annual magazine, Careering, and the CareerWise website, along with the CareerWise Weekly newsletter. She has a background in journalism, having worked previously as a digital editor and reporter. Lindsay is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University’s Global Studies program.
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