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Sunday, November 17, 2019
Research & Trends

5 reports that caught our eye the week of July 1, 2019

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Each week, CERIC is on the lookout for the latest reports related to career development. Here are five reports that we found interesting this week:

Recognizing the Problem: Workplace credentials and the newcomer experience in B.C. (Vancity)

New Canadians in B.C. earn 8% less than workers who are at least third-generation Canadian, while immigrants in Vancouver earn 18%, a new Vancity report has found. The report also found that B.C. immigrants with the same workplace credentials and language abilities as third-plus generation Canadians earn 9% less on average.

Good Career Guidance: Perspectives from the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities sector (The Gatsby Foundation, The Careers & Enterprise Company and Disability Rights UK)

This publication aims to inspire careers leaders, teachers and all those working with young people with special educational needs and disabilities to use the UK’s Gatsby Benchmarks to create a strong career guidance program for each and every young person.

The Next Digital Economy (Policy Horizons Canada)

This report explores how the Next Digital Economy could play out and discusses some implications for policy. It evaluates the digital technologies that will affect the economy as well as the anticipated impact on workers.

Towards Understanding and Supporting Marginalized Children and Youth in Ontario: The Case of Growing Up Indigenous (Wellesley Institute)

This report focuses on the voices and experiences of diverse urban Indigenous youth, parents, service providers and community leaders across Ontario, to discover ways in which future systems change initiatives can better build on the strengths and support success in Indigenous communities.

Motivated to achieve: How encounters with the world of work can change attitudes and improve academic achievement (Education and Employers Research)

This research from the UK finds that participation in career talks with volunteers from the world of work can change the attitudes of 14-to-16-year-old students to their education. This can influence their future plans and subject choices, motivate them to study harder and supports an improvement in academic attainment.


Did we miss something? Leave a comment below or send us a note at careerwise@ceric.ca if you have information that can help make our article even better.

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Lindsay Purchase Administrator
Lindsay Purchase oversees CERIC’s tri-annual magazine, Careering, and the CareerWise website, along with the CareerWise Weekly newsletter. She has a background in journalism, having worked previously as a digital editor and reporter. Lindsay is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University’s Global Studies program.
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Lindsay Purchase Administrator
Lindsay Purchase oversees CERIC’s tri-annual magazine, Careering, and the CareerWise website, along with the CareerWise Weekly newsletter. She has a background in journalism, having worked previously as a digital editor and reporter. Lindsay is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University’s Global Studies program.
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