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Tuesday, July 27, 2021
Tips & Training

5 books on work and education to add to your reading list in 2019

From leadership to longevity, side hustles to feminist schools, these books aim to advance the conversation on careers and education in 2019.

The Talent Revolution: Longevity and the Future of Work

Lisa Taylor and Fern Lebo’s The Talent Revolution exposes work-life longevity as the most influential driver transforming today’s workplace. It describes new models, debunks commonly held myths about older workers, demolishes justifications for traditional structures and attitudes, and builds the case for a reset that will help smart companies profit from their intergenerational workforce.

School Counselor Side Hustle: How School Counselors and Educators Can Monetize their Time and Talents Beyond the Classroom

School counsellors and educators play a vital role in the success of students, but they continue to be financially undervalued and underpaid in the United States. Although this book was written for an American audience, its practical tips on how to develop a side hustle, as well as examples of counsellors who are succeeding in this endeavour, will likely be relevant to broader audiences in the education sector.

The 7 Secrets To Change Your Career: Escape Your Prison and Build a Dream Life

This book by Paul Cope was updated in 2019. It aims to help readers identify the root causes of why they’re unhappy in their jobs and provides guidance on how to pursue greater career happiness. The first two chapters are available for free download.

How Girls Achieve

This book makes the case that most schools are not designed with girls in mind. That is why the world needs what author Sally Nuamah calls “feminist schools,” deliberately designed to provide girls with achievement-oriented identities. And she shows how these schools would help all students, regardless of their gender.

Nine Lies About Work: A Freethinking Leader’s Guide to the Real World

Strengths guru and bestselling author Marcus Buckingham and Cisco Leadership and Team Intelligence head Ashley Goodall argue that there are some big lies – distortions, faulty assumptions, wrong thinking – that we encounter every time we show up for work. They cause dysfunction and frustration, ultimately resulting in workplaces that are a pale shadow of what they could be.


Did we miss something? Leave a comment below or send Editor Lindsay Purchase a note at careerwise@ceric.ca if you have information that can help make our article even better.

Lindsay Purchase Administrator
Lindsay Purchase oversees CERIC’s tri-annual magazine, Careering, and the CareerWise website, along with the CareerWise Weekly newsletter. She has a background in journalism, having worked previously as a digital editor and reporter. Lindsay is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University’s Global Studies program.
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Lindsay Purchase Administrator
Lindsay Purchase oversees CERIC’s tri-annual magazine, Careering, and the CareerWise website, along with the CareerWise Weekly newsletter. She has a background in journalism, having worked previously as a digital editor and reporter. Lindsay is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University’s Global Studies program.
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