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Thursday, January 20, 2022
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Research & Trends

6 reports that caught our eye the week of Jan. 26, 2020

Each week, CERIC is on the lookout for the latest reports related to career development. Here are six reports that we found interesting this week:

Dream Jobs? Teenagers’ Career Aspirations and the Future of Work (OECD)

Huge changes to the world of work over the past two decades have made little impact on teenagers’ career expectations, which have become more concentrated in fewer occupations, according to a new OECD report. Traditional 20th-century occupations such as doctors, teachers, veterinarians, business managers, engineers and police officers continue to capture the imaginations of young people as they did nearly 20 years ago, before the era of social media and the acceleration of technologies such as artificial intelligence in the workplace.

Solving the Skills Puzzle: The Missing Piece is Good Information (Future Skills Centre)

In a world of work increasingly driven by the supply and demand of skills rather than the qualifications of graduates, employers have trouble finding the workers they need and workers struggle to keep up with changing demands. Better and more accessible labour market information lies at the heart of clarifying the skills and training needs of today and tomorrow.

Jobs of Tomorrow: Mapping Opportunity in the New Economy (World Economic Forum)

This new data reveals that 96 jobs across seven professional clusters are fast emerging in tandem, reflecting “digital” and “human” factors driving growth in the professions of tomorrow. The jobs of the future are set to grow by 51% in the horizon up to 2020 and World Economic Forum projects they will present 6.1 million job opportunities globally.

The Global Talent Competitiveness Index 2020 (INSEAD, Adecco, Google)

Addressing the theme of Global Talent in the Age of Artificial Intelligence, this seventh edition of GTCI explores how the development of AI is changing the nature of work and forcing a re-evaluation of workplace practices, corporate structures and innovation ecosystems.

The Impact of the Manufacturing Decline on Local Labour Markets in Canada (Statistics Canada)

This study quantifies the impact of the manufacturing decline on the wages and employment rates of Canadian workers in their local labour markets. The estimates, drawn from census data from 2000 to 2015, indicate that the decline in manufacturing employment had a sizable adverse effect on the wages and full-year, full-time employment rates of men.

Why People Quit Their Jobs (CareerAddict)

Among the survey findings:

  • A lack of progression is the number one reason people would quit their jobs, followed by low pay.
  • 50% of respondents felt their boss took credit for their own work.
  • 1 in 2 respondents said they felt discriminated against by their boss or colleagues.

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Lindsay Purchase Administrator
Lindsay Purchase oversees CERIC’s tri-annual magazine, Careering, and the CareerWise website, along with the CareerWise Weekly newsletter. She has a background in journalism, having worked previously as a digital editor and reporter. Lindsay is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University’s Global Studies program.
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Lindsay Purchase Administrator
Lindsay Purchase oversees CERIC’s tri-annual magazine, Careering, and the CareerWise website, along with the CareerWise Weekly newsletter. She has a background in journalism, having worked previously as a digital editor and reporter. Lindsay is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University’s Global Studies program.
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