fbpx
Friday, October 22, 2021
reports that caught our eye the week of June
Research & Trends

5 reports that caught our eye the week of June 23, 2019

Each week, CERIC is on the lookout for the latest reports related to career development. Here are three reports that we found interesting this week:

The path to prosperity: Why the future of work is human (Deloitte)

This report examines myths that have been busted about the future of work, skills that will be most in demand and how businesses and governments can make better choices about work, workers and workplaces. While the report speaks specifically to the Australian workforce, much of the information will likely be of interest to a global audience.

Help Wanted: Modernizing Employment and Skills Training Services in Ontario (Toronto Region Board of Trade, Metcalf Foundation and United Way Greater Toronto)

This report provides guiding principles and recommendations for the Ontario government to enhance the current employment and skills training system to better serve people and business and create more value for the economy.

The future of women at work: Transitions in the age of automation (McKinsey)

Between 40 million and 160 million women globally may need to transition between occupations by 2030, often into higher-skilled roles. To weather this disruption, women (and men) need to be skilled, mobile, and tech-savvy, but women face pervasive barriers on each, and will need targeted support to move forward in the world of work.

2019 Compensation Best Practices Report (PayScale)

This report is centered around the idea that it’s becoming increasingly challenging to attract and retain employees in today’s tight job market. Among the findings:

  • 66% of respondents agree or strongly agree retention is a growing concern
  • Nearly half say the strong job market has increased their turnover rate
The role of social capital and ethnocultural characteristics in the employment income of immigrants over time (Statistics Canada)

This study examines the impact of social capital and ethnocultural characteristics on the evolution of employment income of a cohort of immigrants who arrived in Canada in 2001. It founds having friends was positively correlated with employment income. It also found that some groups designated as visible minorities and some categories of religious affiliation consistently had lower employment incomes.


Did we miss something? Leave a comment below or send us a note at careerwise@ceric.ca if you have information that can help make our article even better.

Lindsay Purchase Administrator
Lindsay Purchase oversees CERIC’s tri-annual magazine, Careering, and the CareerWise website, along with the CareerWise Weekly newsletter. She has a background in journalism, having worked previously as a digital editor and reporter. Lindsay is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University’s Global Studies program.
follow me
×
Lindsay Purchase Administrator
Lindsay Purchase oversees CERIC’s tri-annual magazine, Careering, and the CareerWise website, along with the CareerWise Weekly newsletter. She has a background in journalism, having worked previously as a digital editor and reporter. Lindsay is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University’s Global Studies program.
follow me
Latest Posts
  • Woman using tablet in office.
  • Stack of books and orange pumpkins set on autumn foliage
  • Students walking in college library.